GP Training Webinars Launched

Genetic haemochromatosis is the UK’s most common – yet under-diagnosed – genetic condition. A typical GP practice will have an average of 15 people affected by haemochromatosis on its list, possibly undiagnosed.

Working in partnership with the Royal College of GPs, Haemochromatosis UK (HUK) has developed training resources & an eLearning module covering genetic haemochromatosis.

To mark the launch of the Royal College of GP’s eLearning module on genetic haemochromatosis, HUK is holding a series of webinars for GPs and other primary care staff.

Based on the RCGP eLearning module, we will be covering :

  • What is Genetic Haemochromatosis?
  • Clinical features and symptoms
  • Genetics
  • Testing for family & siblings
  • Referral care pathway
  • Treatment and ongoing management

General practitioners, practice managers and practice nurses are invited to register for one or more webinars :

  • Thursday 29 August at 10:00 – 10:45
  • Wednesday 04 September at 13:00 – 13:45
  • Tuesday 24 September at 17:00 – 17:45
  • Monday 30 September at 10:00 – 10:45

Registration is quick & easy. Simply complete this form:

>> Webinar sign up form

These webinars are free, thanks to the generous support of the Shears Foundation.

For further details – or to arrange local, face-2-face training, GP information packs and patient resources – clinicians can simply get in touch by emailing education@huk.org.uk.

Primary care clinicians can also meet out team at the Best Practice Show at the NEC Birmingham 09 – 10 October and the RCGP Annual Conference in Liverpool 24 – 26 October.


Notes

Haemochromatosis/GH is a genetic disorder causing the body to absorb excessive iron from the diet. Characterised by joint pain and disease, chronic fatigue and weakness, cognitive and psychological difficulties, sexual health issues, skin problems, abnormal liver function, diabetes, and cardiomyopathy. Iron overload can be fatal. It is usually easily treated if diagnosed early.

If you believe you have haemochromatosis or any other condition, please talk to your GP.